Eliminating Racial Disparities in Maternal Health

Due Season: A Faith-Filled Roadmap Toward
Eliminating Racial Disparities in Maternal Health

The National Council of Churches moves forward in development of a project to eliminate racial disparities in maternal health. The project, Due Season: A Faith-Filled Roadmap Toward Eliminating Racial Disparities in Maternal Health, will develop congregational materials exploring the intersection of maternal health and race within the U.S. and moving people to advocate for change.

According to a 2010 report by Amnesty International, African-American women are four times more likely to die of pregnancy related complications than their white counterparts, while at the same time white U.S. women already have a significantly higher maternal mortality rate than women in 24 other industrialized countries.

"The fact that we continue to see such vast disparities in maternal health along racial lines is deeply troubling," said the Rev. Ann Tiemeyer, Program Director of the NCC’s Women’s Ministries. "We are living in the wealthiest country in the world in the twenty first century. Pregnancies should be healthy and safe, regardless of the mother’s race."

The goal of the Due Season project is to create a toolkit with input from medical professionals, church and community leaders, and people with personal experience around this issue. The toolkit will be available for free to help communities engage in study, prayer, and action to end this alarming trend.

This project grew out of what we learned while using the resource Fistula Stories, which explores maternal health in a global context.

This online clip from the movie UNNATURAL CAUSES: Is Inequality Making Us Sick? provides examples of the intersections of maternal health and race which the Due Season project will seek to address:

With appreciation for support from